Tag Archives: Harveys

Manga at the Harveys 2014

AoT 1This last week at Baltimore Comic Con, the Harvey Awards were held. Like the Eisners, the Harveys honor the best in comics and sequential art. Unlike the Eisners, the Harveys are nominated and voted on by the comic professionals themselves. It’s about creators honoring other creators for their work. While the awards center mostly around American comics, manga does get a nod in the “Best American Edition of Foreign Material” category. This year, three manga got nods: Attack on Titan by Hajime Isayama and published by Kodansha Comics, Sunny by Taiyo Matsumoto and published by Viz Media, and Showa: A History of Showa Japan by Shigeru Mizuki and published by Fantagraphics.

All three titles have their merits. Attack on Titan, while sorely lacking the art department has a compelling story and interesting characters, things that have made it a huge franchise both in Japan and here in the States. Volume 1 of the series has been on the New York Times Bestseller List for almost 70 consecutive weeks. Sunny is a semi-autobiographical slice of life story about several kids living at the Star Kids Home orphanage, and one of the few constant things in their life is the old yellow Sunny in the backyard that the kids use to escape their real life problems. It won both the Slate Book Review and Vermont’s Center for Cartoon Studies’ Best Graphic Novel Prize earlier this year. Showa: A History of Showa Japan covers the events of the first 14 years of the Showa period, from 1926-1939. It won the 2009 Asahi Prize in Japan for its contributions to culture and society.

While all three titles are worthy, only one could claim the prize. And the winner, surprising or not, is Attack on Titan. Having read the second half of the series out so far, I can understand it winning. The story touches on lots of different topics, and is a suspenseful, thrilling adventure. I can only imagine the story won on these merits. While the art has improved a lot since its first few volumes, it still has problems.

cyborg_009_coverAlso nominated, but not in the Foreign Material category was Deron Bennett’s Cyborg 009, a comic adaptation of Shotaro Ishimori’s manga of the same name, and published by Boom! Studios. The series got several nods in the categories Best Original Graphic Novel, Best Letterer, and Special Award for Excellence in Presentation. Unfortunately, it lost in all three categories, but the book is an interesting adaptation that stays true to the spirit of the original while trying to appeal to a wider audience.

This Week in Manga: 8/28-9/3/10

Manga Movable Feast: Kid’s Table

This month’s Manga Movable Feast started this week and doesn’t feature just one title. It’s actually about all all ages titles, with Yotsuba&! as the focus, as well as another all ages title mainly just so the pun “Yotsuba & …” could be used. Thank Ed Sizemore of the Manga Worth Reading blog for that. It’s being hosted this time at the Good Comics For Kids blog, which specializes in news, reviews, articles and interviews about and with the people who make manga and comics for kids 16 and under. The introduction article is here, and the archive is here. Interestingly, a lot of the reviews and articles are about how Yotsuba&! isn’t really a kid’s title. I myself didn’t see it appealing much to a kid, but I think that’s because the appeal I found in it was the way it reminded me of my kids at that age. But if kids are anything, they are surprising. Check out the links for reviews of Yotsuba&! and other all ages manga.

Rolling Out Online Manga

Deb Aoki of About.Manga.com spoke with Crunchyroll CEO Kun Gao to get the low down on Cruchyroll’s announcement of capital from Japanese cell phone publisher Bitway. What he had to say won’t get fans hopes up too high for a “Crunchyroll for manga”.  Cruchyroll is working with Bitway in a technology role, not publisher, so don’t expect to see Bleach or Naruto manga on the anime streaming site. One thing that would be nice to come out of this move though would be uniform platform for reading manga. Right now, everyone who is hosting manga legitimately is using different systems and different readers that can be platform specific. And in this world where the web is the platform, being told your Mac or Windows Mobile phone won’t work will make a lot of manga readers unhappy.  Theses different platforms can also make reading online frustrating. After weeks of seemless reading on eManga, the load times on Viz’s SigIkki were downright agonizing. I could only read three chapters where I can usually read twice that on eManga. It made reading a title I enjoy downright painful, and that’s not what digital manga should be about.

One Piece takes 4 week break; Oda takes 1

It was recently announced that One Piece will be taking a 4 week hiatus from Weekly Shonen Jump magazine.  There’s no reason given, but considering Oda has only taken occassional 1 week breaks over the life of the title, which started in the same year my 13-year-old daughter was born, I think he’s entitled to a month off. He’s certainly not like mangaka Yoshihiro Togashi who works for maybe 4 weeks and then takes years off.  But, apparently, Oda is a workaholic. After only one week, he’s back to work according to this tweet. If anyone has a link or can do a direct translation, it would be greatly appreciated. I’ve just started working on colors in Japanese. Maybe he’s just really excited to get some great stuff to us readers.

Is It A Curse?

The Harveys, the comic world version of the Academy Awards were announced at the Baltimore Comic Con. The category of Best American of Foreign Material was heavy once again with Naoki Urasawa manga, but was denied again as the award went to The Art of Osamu Tezuka by Helen McCarthy. The book, an overview of the life and work of Osamu Tezuka, is the most complete available in english. It’s a must have for any fan of Tezuka, or anyone interested in the history of manga. But Urawasa, who had two titles nominated this year, one co-incidentally based on an Osaum Tezuka story, was just shut out. This seems to be a disturbing pattern with Urasawa and American awards. By the rules of chance, he’s got to win eventually?  Right?

NYT Best Seller List

It’s a twister Auntie Em!  The best seller list for manga gets mixed up but not a lot of change. Starting on the hardback list, Twilight has dug into #6 and seems determined to stay there. Over on the manga list, Maximum Ride vol 3 holds on to the #1 spot. Naruto vol 48 makes it’s move back up to #2 and Rosario + Vampire: Season II vol 2 and Black Bird vol 5 keep up their buddy system by taking #3 and #4. Bakuman vol 1 moves up to take over #5 while the only new comer to the list, Chi’s Sweet Home vol 2 debuts at #6. Yeah for kitties! Negima! Magister Negi Magi vol 27 falls back two to #7 while D.Gray-man vol 18 holds on to #8. Spots #9 and #10 remain the same as well with Vampire Knight vol 10 and Black Butler vol 2 holding on.

NYT: Second Opinion

We’ve got two second opinions now! First if from Matt Blind at Rocketbomber:

1. Maximum Ride 3
Naruto 48
Rosario+Vampire Season II 2
Black Bird 5
5. Bleach Color Bleach+: The Official Bootleg
6. Negima! 27
7. Fullmetal Alchemist 23
8. Vampire Knight 10
9. Ouran High School Host Club 14
10. Maximum Ride 1

The top four still hold true between Matt’s and the NYT’s. Matt keeps Fullmetal Alchemist around and adds Ouran High School Host Club. Now Mangacast has posted the Book Scan numbers for this same week, and that give us:

  1. Maximum Ride vol 3
  2. Naruto vol 48
  3. Pokemon: Diamond & Pearl vol  7
  4. Rosario+Vampire II vol 3
  5. Black Bird vol 5
  6. BakuMan. vol 1
  7. Negima! vol 27
  8. Fullmetal Alchemist vol 23
  9. Black Butler vol 1
  10. Black Butler vol 2

The Book Scan list has more in common with the NYT list than the Amazon/B&N numbers, it only agrees with the top two spots, and it adds Pokemon: Diamond and Pearl to the mix. The interesting thing about seeing all three of these lists now is that you can be pretty sure about the top two titles, as well as the top five titles if not order. The differences are small, usually only by a title or two. I think that’s fairly significant.

Manga For Your Ears

Sesho’s Anime and Manga Reviews

This Week At Manga Village

What I’m Reading

  • I Am A Turtle ch 2-3
  • Children of the Sea ch 26-30
  • House of Five Leaves ch 5-7

This Week in Manga: 7/9-7/16/10

Manga Factory Direct

Anime News Network was able to talk to company representative Mika Ogata and get some more details about Manga Factory and their prior relationship with Aurora. Despite having been former employees and having volumes of the defunct publishers books for sale, there is no connection between Manga Factory and Aurora. They are completely new company. The books are just a way to get some funds in. They won’t be making any announcements for licenses for the summer, but considering they’ve just started, that’s understandable. And I think it makes total sense for former employees to band together like this and create their own company. They no doubt have the contacts and the knowledge of the US manga market, that executives back in Japan that were calling the shots didn’t. This is like a manga fan’s dream come true, and I hope they succeed, just to prove that dreams like this can still come true.

Manga at the Harveys

The Harveys are awards nominated by and chosen for people in the comics industry. Since this is for the US comics industry, manga doesn’t make a big splash except in the “American Edition of Foreign Material” category. Two manga got nominations this year, and they are the two most likely to be read by comics fans; 20th Century Boys and Pluto, both by Naoki Urasawa. No one can deny the strength of these stories. Urasawa knows how to tell a tale and tell it well. On the surface it might seem hard to choose between the two, but not for me. I’m going for Pluto all the way. Winners will be announced at the San Diego Comic Con next weekend.

Is the Pressure working?

Found via Twitter. Another site that hosted scanlations has bowed to legal pressures and taken down all of the manga from members in the coalition. Manga Toshokan announced last night on their forums that:

we have been advised to remove all series serialized by the publishers in the coalition.

That doesn’t mean they have taken down everything. There is still manga from publishers not in the coalition, as well as manhwa and manhua. Needless to saw (but I’ll say it anyway), this has led to a lengthy thread that was at 77 pages as of this writing. Manga Toshokan realizes that they will lose a lot of their members because of this, and have a created a survey that they intend to send to publishers in the coalition. The questions seem worded mostly to say that sites like theirs are wanted and needed. While I don’t doubt that a digital solution is needed, I don’t think their survey will do much to sway anyone. It’s a different tactic though. Better than screaming obscenities at the publishers or crying for a boycott.

Planning for SDCC

If you’re going to the San Diego Comic Con this year, you’d better have a plan. With so many people and so many panels, there’s no way to just “wing it”. You’ll never get to see anything but the backs of the people in line ahead of you who DID have a plan. Kate Dacey at the Manga Critic helps you get started with information on some of the smaller publishers with panel times and special signing they’ll be hosting. Melinda Beasi of Manga Bookshelf has some of the activities for Viz and Tokyopop as well, which covers most of the publishers that will be there. I’d say it’s sad to have a year without CMX, except they never got a far shake at the DC booth. They have one of the larger booths just for the comics (not counting the Warner Bros booth which is usually next door) and they couldn’t even be bothered to give CMX their own table or put out samplers to promote them. It’s been said before, but I have to say it again. Screw you, DC.

NYT Best Seller List

It’s a new week, so that means a new best seller list. Starting from the top, we have Twilight in its usual spot of #1 of the Hardback list. It seems to be getting comfortable there, doesn’t it? Kicking off the manga list, we have not only a debut title, but it comes right in at #1. Ouran High School Host Club vol 14 kicks Naruto vol 48 back to #2. The newest One Piece vol 54 also debuts at #3, officially ending the massive manga wave, which leaves last week’s #1, The Last Airbender to fall to #4. Vampire Knight vol 10 takes a dive as well, from #2 to #5, and drops Soul Eater for Black Butler vol 2. I think they’re better suited for each other anyway. The third debut is Shaman King vol 29 coming in at #7 while Black Butler vol 1 moves back up to #8. Gotta keep an eye on those vampires.  Fourth and Fifth debuts are both shojo. Nana vol 21 takes the #9 spot while Stepping on Roses vol 1 takes #10. This is quite a week as the girls rock the list and show the guys who’s really in charge. Viz comes off the winner too, with 7/10 and 4 of the top 5 spots. I wonder what they’ll have to announce at SDCC that will be appearing here soon (no doubt).

News From Japan

New Crayon Shin-chan Manga

Japanese publisher Futabasha has announced that a new series of Crayon Shin-chan will launch in the Sept. issue of Monthly Manga Town, where the original ran until the untimely death of its mangaka Yoshito Usui in a climbing accident last year. This new series will be done by Usui’s assistants, and the series will be officially credited at “Yoshito Usui and UY Studio”. It will be called Shin Crayon Shin-chan (New Crayon Shin-chan) and will continue to follow the madcap adventures of kindergartener Shin and his family and friends. I think this is a nice way to give tribute to the mangaka. Though I’m starting to think the series itself is cursed in the US. It was first licensed by Comics One, and then picked up by CMX, neither company even got close to completing its run. Maybe this is a series best left unlicensed.

Manga For Your Ears

Manga Out Loud

Sesho’s Anime and Manga Reviews

This Week at Manga Village

What I’ve been Reading

  • Paradise Kiss vol 1
  • Chi’s Sweet Home vol 1-2
  • Neko Raman vol 1
  • Bakuman vol 1