Category Archives: Reviews

Blood Alone Volumes 1-3: Manga Movable Feast

For recently turned vampire Minato Misaki, vampirism and the beastly powers that come with it are something that she wouldn’t wish upon her worst enemy, let alone her beloved Kuroe. But Kuroe’s supernatural investigations make him a regular target of not only vampires but of all sorts of undead creatures of the night. The only way to save him from these deadly threats may be to do the one thing that Misaki fears the most: to turn Kuroe into a vampire for his own protection.

By Masayuki Takano
Publisher: Seven Seas Entertainment
Age Rating: Older Teen
Genre: Supernatural/Vampires/Horror
Price: $15.99
Rating: ★★★★★

I’ve had this volume in my review pile for a while, and kept meaning to read it. I’d heard a lot of good things about it, and after reading a review of it for the Manga Movable Feast I hosted last year, I was really interested, but I am easily distracted, and it was soon buried by the growing review pile. With this month’s MMF being about vampires, it seemed the perfect time to dig it out. And I’m really glad I did. Blood Alone isn’t the typical vampire series with a lot of angst and melodrama. Instead, it is populated with rich, interesting characters and a story that is a mix of slice of life and murder mystery with a sprinkling of vampires.

Blood Alone revolves around Kuroe, a former Vampire Hunter and Misaki, a young vampire girl. It might seem like an odd pairing, until you get to know them. As the story begins, we don’t know how long they’ve been together, but it’s obviously been a while, as they are comfortable with each other and have a set routine. Masaki isn’t a vampire who just looks like a 10 to 12-year-old girl, she actually is still a tween. She doesn’t like to sleep alone, is afraid of thunder, and can be melodramatic. She has a big time crush on Kuroe, and is quick to get jealous when any other women speak to him. She is sweet and innocent in a charming kind of way. She doesn’t like being a vampire and hates having to drink blood. She doesn’t know much about her new abilities, so it’s cute when she tries them on Kuroe for the first time.

Kuroe appears rather laid back. He is a writer, but to cover bills between books he also works as a private investigator, taking jobs as varied as finding a lost cat to being a bodyguard. He appears unassuming, but he’s actually a well-trained fighter and seems to have quite a reputation in the vampire community. He is absolutely devoted to Masaki, often worrying about her when she goes off on her own, and trying to give her time alone with him. His feeling for her however are much more of a brotherly kind. Kuroe doesn’t appear to have an interest in anyone romantically. He was infatuated with his older sister, who was taken by a vampire several years earlier, and is probably the reason he became a Vampire Hunter. He does have a special ability that he earned while trying to save his sister. His eyes were wounded by the vampire, and now he can see when something is trying to be something it isn’t. And he’s immune to vampire tricks. A rather useful trait for a vampire hunter.

Assisting Kuroe and Masaki is an interesting supporting cast. Sayaka Sainome is a long time friend of Kuroe’s who is the head of a police forensics department. She often asks Kuroe for help in cases where the supernatural might be involved. She is also Masaki’s potentially biggest rival for Kuroe’s attention. Higure is an elder vampire who looks like a boy, but is really very old. He controls the vampire territory where Kuroe and Misaki live, helping Misaki learn about her vampiric powers and tolerating Kuroe. Sly is an underworld figure who is a friend of both Kuroe and Misaki who also happens to be a vampire. He helps them out with information. His partner is a cat named Larry. While it doesn’t seem right to call any cat “owned” by a human, it seems especially inappropriate for Larry.

The stories range from slice of life stories, such as Misaki’s humming inspiring a down and out musician to write again, to murder mysteries, with Sayaka and Kuroe hunting down a serial killer’s soul, to action with Kuroe fighting a vampire guild of assassins. The mix of stories keeps the series from getting boring or bogged down, as it never spends too much time on any vampire angst. The side characters get some attention too. Sayaka gets a story to work out issues she had with her deceased father. What I really enjoyed about this omnibus, was how easy it was to get lost in volume. At three volumes it was the perfect length, and the kinds of stories covered made for a perfect introduction to the characters and the world. The art is beautifully rendered as well. The characters never get too silly looking. All of their emotions are handled realistically, without being too realistic.

Blood Alone is exactly the kind of vampire title I’ve been looking for. It has a strong and varied range of characters and stories to suit. It has its own vampire mythos that doesn’t stray far from established canon, and doesn’t dwell on the angst of being a vampire. It acknowledges it without letting it overwhelm the story. This is a great title for readers who want more from their vampires than just killing things or moping. I highly recommend it.

Digital review copy provided by publisher.

Ju-On: Video Side

This chilling tale of murder, secrets, and revenge centers on a home and the ugly events that transpired there. The place now has new owners, but there is a vile presence that permeates the building and pollutes every surface. What wickedness set off this unstoppable angry spirit? Why has its bloody grudge infected the home and its inhabitants? In the spirit of The Ring, Ju-On –Video Side– delivers a dark warning of a cursed spirit and the corrupting influence it has on the living.

Story by Takashi Shimizu; Adaptation by Miki Rinno
Publisher: Dark Horse Comics
Age Rating: Older Teen
Genre: Horror
Price: $9.95
Rating: ★★★★☆

While I don’t care for most horror movies in general, I do like the J-Horror movies that came out in the early 2000s. I have been on a quest to read as many of the manga adaptations that have come out as I can. So far I have read The Ring 0-3, Dark Water and One Missed Call. The manga adaptations have been hit or miss for me, so when I finally got my hands on Ju-On: Video Side, I wasn’t sure which way it would go. It’s actually a pretty good adaptation, just not of the movie as released here in the US.

Ju-On: Video Side tells the story of the Murakami family, the family to live in the house after the Saekis, who were the originators of the curse. Their story was originally told in the 2000 direct-to -video film Ju-On, or Ju-On: The Curse, and is a prequel to the theatrical movie. The story follows Tsuyoshi Murakami and his friend Mizuho, the daughter of Tatsuya Tamura, a friend of Tsyuoshi’s father, and the realtor who sold the Murakami’s their new house. Starting with Tatsuya’s mysterious dismemberment, one person after another is killed at the hands of Kayoko and Toshio’s hands. Some for doing nothing more than walking into the house.

I liked this adaptation. It didn’t follow the theatrical movies, so the story was fresher. It also told the story straightforwardly and in chronological order, so there was no trying to get your head around what was going one. I also liked a lot of the little differences that happen in the manga. Tsuyoshi’s sister Kanna isn’t killed feeding rabbits, but stray cats, which makes some sense since Toshio’s spirit is merged with a cat. The scene is very disturbing though. It’s gives a good shock too, as two police officers investigating the attack stare at something off-screen, taking about what it could be, which is inter-cut with scenes of Kanna dragging herself home. The build up is paid off in the reveal.

I also like what happened between Tsuyoshi and Mizuho. The story builds them up as not just the protagonists, but with a budding romance as well. This makes what Tsuyoshi does disturbing yet touching, even if he was under Kayoko’s influence at the time. The volume ends not on an uplifting note, but with a feeling that there could be hope. Kayoko and Toshio are shown to be just as much victims of the curse as the people who move into the house, and that adds to the overall emotion. Ju-on isn’t a personal vendetta, or mindless serial killer killing for the pleasure. It’s like a force of nature, and sweeps up anyone and everyone in its path.

If you’re interested in picking up the manga of a J-Horror, Ju-On: Video Side is a good choice. It hits different notes than the videos and movies, and hits them well. There is some blood and gore, but nowhere near as much as many western horror movies, and you can turn the page fast if it really bothers you. Just don’t read this in the dark, when you’re alone, and where there are cats. You might not get any sleep for a while.



Wonderful Life with the Elements

In this super periodic table, every element is a unique character whose properties are represented visually: heavy elements are fat, man-made elements are robots, and noble gases sport impressive afros. Every detail is significant, from the length of an element’s beard to the clothes on its back. You’ll also learn about each element’s discovery,its common uses, and other vital stats like whether it floats–or explodes–in water.

By Bunpei Yorifuji
Publisher: No Starch Press
Age Rating: Teen
Genre: Science
Price: $17.95

I first learned about this title through the manga reviews column in Otaku USA. I found the visuals and concept so intriguing, that I jumped at the chance to review it myself! I’d always found Chemistry interesting, and with my oldest daughter currently taking the class, it seemed a good opportunity. Wonderful Life with the Elements didn’t disappoint. It was fun, educational, and rather thought-provoking.

What stands out first and foremost about Wonderful Life with the Elements is it isn’t a traditional manga. There’s no story to follow with the science incorporated like the Manga Guide series. It’s really more of an illustrated book, with the illustrations telling just as much, if not more, as the text. Yorifuji does incorporate a small narrative with his “atom man”, which is mostly seen on the dividing pages between sections and is rather cute. The book starts with graphs that show the elemental make up of our world, and how our use of the elements have changed and grown starting from prehistoric times to today.

The heart of the book is the periodic table. Yorifuji explains the reason for illustrating the table, so newcomers can not only know the names but also learn many of their properties at a glance. The way he does this, is to come up with a character that can be used to show the properties. First he creates the character’s face, which is based on the parts of an atom. It’s cute and clever. This “Atom man”, which is made very obvious from the anatomically correct way he is drawn, is then dressed up. Hair is used to show what family an element is from. Afros show the cool Noble gases. Spikes are for the volatile zinc family, and mohawks are for the nitrogen family where many poisons come from. Atomic weight is shown as body weight. Clothes show how the element is used, such as everyday use, specialty or industrial. When an element was discovered is shown as facial hair, and even the element’s matter state can be determined by the legs.

Each element is placed on a pedestal, which is usually some item that it plays in important role in. Indium, which is big in the production of LCD screens, stands on one. Gallium is the element that helps make blu-ray players and gaming machines, so he is standing on a Playstation 3. Along with each illustration is a blurb of text that explains a little about the element, and all around him are smaller pictures, showing several of the other uses. Some of these can be funny, such as with Neodymium, which was used to make the world’s strongest magnet, so there’s a picture of Neodymium’s face getting stuck to a metal pellet. Even though it isn’t stated, the poisonous elements are also differentiated with the eyes. Poisonous elements have big, empty eyes, like a ghost or skeleton, making their ominous intent obvious.

The last part of the book gets personal. It explores how our bodies are made up of the elements, and what happens when we have too much or too little of them. It will make reading the dietary information on the back of food packages a little more relevant. It also talks about how the elements are just that. These are the basic building blocks of life and the universe, and as such are finite. It emphasizes the importance of recycling these elements, especially the ones that make our modern technology possible, because if we don’t, we may not have them for much longer.

No Starch Press’ presentation of the book is very nicely done. It’s a hardback, but is just a couple of inches smaller that an average manga and just as much wider. It has a slipcover that has cheats for how the elements are represented; hair, clothes, matter states, etc. It’s a good reference when you need to be reminded what a hairstyle was for again. There is a nice ribbon bookmark attached, so you’ll never lose your place which also makes a good cat toy, at least our newest kitten thinks so. There is also a poster included, which is perfect for the classroom or display.

I really enjoyed reading Wonderful Life with the Elements. It was fun, and I learned a lot of things I didn’t know before. I may not have the memorized table from this one reading, but there are certainly some that stick out, like Neodymium, that I never knew about before. What really enthuses me about this book is how it has piqued the interest of my daughter. As I said, she is taking Chemistry, and when I showed her the review of the book, she loved the idea. And when I got a copy of the book, she said she wanted to read it too. And then show it to some of her geekier friends. And then give it to her Chemistry teacher, so he can hopefully use it in class. If it can engage kids, and make learning a fun experience, which it seems it does, then it’s a book that gets an A+ from me.

Review copy provided by publisher.


Otomen Volume 1-5: Manga Movable Feast

Asuka Masamune enjoys the girly things in life, such as sewing and cooking. But due to a traumatic event that happened with his father when he was young, he can’t ever let his mother know about this side of himself. In fact, he thinks he can’t let anyone know, and so he plays the part of a stoic manly man, excelling in kendo and reading Bushido. But there is one person in his class who does know about the real Asuka; Juta Tachibana. He is a mangaka, and has created a popular series using Asuka as the model for his female lead. In order to further his manga, he encourages Asuka get closer to Ryo, a new girl at their school that Asuka has fallen for. As his relationship with Ryo slowly develops, Asuka meets other otomen and learns he isn’t alone.

By Aya Kanno
Publisher: Viz Media – Shojo Beat
Age Rating: Teen
Genre: Romantic Comedy
Price: $9.99
Rating: ★★★★½

When Otomen first came out, I wasn’t impressed by the premise or the preview that ran in Shojo Beat at the time. I also didn’t care for Kanno’s previous title Blank Slate, so I didn’t have a lot of hope for this new one. A podcast review convinced me to re-evaluate and give the series a try. I’m glad I did. Otomen is cute and funny, and is more comedy than romance.

What really makes Otomen is the characters. When Asuka is first introduced, he looks the part of the manly man. Strong and silent, dressed in this kendo robes, he looks like he could have stepped out of a shonen manga. And then he starts to fall for Ryo, and his true self comes out. I love the scene with him after going on a “girly” spending spree and bringing home all kinds of crafty things and shojo manga. His despair over this is made more funny when he puts together a stuffed bear without really realizing his was doing it! I really enjoy the role reversal that Kanno has created with Asuka. He is very much the shojo lead, as all his inner thoughts and turmoil are shared with the reader. He even blushes a lot like most shojo leads. I really love Asuka’s dichotomy of still being a man while having all of these traditionally female hobbies. If only more men could be like him.

Surrounding Asuka is quite a cast of characters. Ryo, his love interest, complements him well. She can’t cook, or clean, and is hopeless at sewing and crafts. She has a masculine outlook, and though she says she prefers manly men, she doesn’t mind his feminine ways. She often takes the traditional male role such as being the brave one in a haunted house, or riding in on a white horse to rescue him from an arranged marriage. Juta Tachibana is a bit of a playboy, and has been orchestrating a lot of Asuka and Ryo’s relationship for the sake of his shojo manga, “Love Chick.” He will go to any length to get good material for his manga, including playing a rival for Ryo’s affections, breaking and entering Asuka’s potential bride, and staying outside the old school building in a blizzard so Asuka and Ryo can be alone in a romantic Christmas moment. He is also adament about not letting his real identity get out, and is even willing to dress up as a woman to keep it secret. I think in a lot of ways, Juta is the first fellow Otoman that Asuka meets.

And there are more otomen out there. Asuka’s self-proclaimed kendo rival, Hajime Tonomine turns out to have a secret passion for makeup and giving women makeovers. They end up working together when they are asked to help out at a women’s event and don the costumes of members of the Harakiri Ronin Samurai Five, and then volunteer to give a makeover when the artist gets stuck in traffic. I love when manga references Tokusatsu shows, so I really enjoyed this chapter in volume 3, and was thrilled when they made a come back in volume 5. Then there’s Kitora Kurokawa, who loves flowers too much. He is very tall and since he doesn’t talk much is seen by the other girls as mysterious. His weakness is wanting to cover beautiful things in flowers, which includes Ryo, Asuka, Hajime and even Juta.

The story starts out focusing on Asuka and Ryo and Juta using them for his manga, but then shifts toward more with discovering more otomen. I’m glad the story did start to shift, because Asuka and Ryo’s relationship really wasn’t going anywhere by volume 3, so it really needed something more. But I did start to miss hearing about developments for Love Chick, and really enjoyed the chapter in volume 5 where Juta has to accept an award, and has to come up with a way to do with revealing he’s really a man as his editor wants, and he’s rescued by his idol mangaka. Kanno also does a good job of balancing Asuka’s two sides, the masculine and feminine. He can be really cute sometimes when he blushing, and others thinking he’ll make a good wife. But he’s still a man and it still comes through when he leaps to action to save Ryo from a bull, a bomb, or a little boy from falling out a window. Asuka is the ideal man.

Otomen is a great series, filled a lot of great characters and funny situations. It’s romantic comedy at its best, because it is so unconventional in its material. I look forward to reading more about Asuka, Ryo, Juta and the rest of the otomen. And since this title is available on Viz’s manga site, I can just right back in where I left off without overloading the bookshelf. If you want some light, fun reading, definitely pick this title up.

Wanted: Manga Movable Feast-Arrr!

Arr, it be that time o’ year again. Aye matey, it be Talk Like o’ Pirate Day! To shiver yer timbers, I be reviewin’ a pirate manga that also be fittin’ in ta da Movable Manga Feast this month. So grab yerself a bottle o’ rum ‘n find out about Wanted Arrrr…

In the Mediterranean at the end of the 17th century, former songstress Armeria disguises herself as a boy and boards the ship of the pirate Skulls–the man who kidnapped Luce, her first love. Captain Skulls is arrogant, violent, and a skirt chaser! And unfortunately for Armeria, he discovers she’s a woman…

By Matsuri Hino
Publisher: Viz Media – Shojo Beat
Age Rating: Older Teen
Genre: Romance
Price: $8.99
Rating: ★★★½☆

My introduction to Hino’s work was through the serialization of her most current title Vampire Knight in Shojo Beat. I really didn’t care for it, so when this volume came out, I had little interest in it. But, curiosity got the better of me, and I picked it up. I am slightly surprised that I enjoyed it as much as I did, but it is about as different from Vampire Knight as night is to day.

The thing I disliked most about Vampire Knight is the way drama oozed from every pore of every character. The characters in Wanted are the exact opposite. Armeria doesn’t just sit around bemoaning her loss or wait for Luce to come for her. She take the initiative, disguising herself as a man and joins different ships searching for the pirates that kidnapped him eight years ago. Armeria is spunky and headstrong. She is determined to remain on the ship with Skulls until she finds Luce, and she doesn’t let his barbs get her down.

Skulls, the pirate captain, tries to come off as a scoundrel and a ladies man, but he is essentially a good person. He saves Armeria several times, and only robs from nobles who take advantage of the people and then give the wealth back to them. He is like a pirate Robin Hood and his crew are his Merry Men. And it’s a motley crew of merry men at that. They are never formally introduced, but there are a few that are featured in the chapters. His first mate, Second, is a big, shirtless, bald black man who knows his captain all too well. Doc is an older man who like the father figure of the crew, and Fourth and Fifth, crewmen skilled in sailing and swordsmanship. The names aren’t very original, but they are all fun none the less.

There are three chapters about Armeria and Skulls, and a bonus chapter that takes place in Meiji Japan. I really enjoyed the pirate chapters. They were light and fun. There is swashbuckling, raiding, cannon fire, battles with the navy, and secret treasure; everything that makes pirate stories fun. I didn’t care so much for the bonus chapter. It has the same feel as the Wanted chapters, but it just didn’t work as well for me. It moved too fast for me to really believe it, though I did kind of like the characters.

The art is very Hino, with the girls having big eyes and the men all being bishonen. And the hair is everywhere. But I was fine with it in this volume. The characters were different and varied enough that it didn’t get on my nerves. It was to have a beard, dreadlocks and even no hair at all!

Wanted is a fun romp for a romantic pirate adventure. I liked the relationship between Arto (Armeria) and Skulls. I love that they are always at odds. Even though Skulls’ identity was pretty obvious, it’s reveal didn’t ruin the story. So matey, if ye be wantin’ some good pirate romance, be pickin’ up Wanted!

St. Dragon Girl Volumes 1-5: Manga Movable Feast

Momoka Sendou (nicknamed “Dragon Girl”) and Ryuga Kou are childhood friends. Momoka is a martial artist, and Ryuga is a Chinese magic master who banishes demons. In order to increase his power, Ryuga calls on the spirit of a dragon to possess him, but the spirit enters Momoka instead. Now the two must unite forces and fight demons together!

By Natsumi Matsumoto
Publisher: Viz Media – Shojo Beat
Age Rating: Teen
Genre: Romance
Price: $9.99
Rating: ★★★★½

St. Dragon Girl is a title that has two things going for it. Dragons and a couple that denies their feelings for each other. While the second thing is a bit of a trope for shojo titles, I can’t help having a soft spot for their kind of relationship; the childhood friends who tease, bait and strike back.

The female lead of this story, Momoka, has a lot of tomboy traits. Her father is the head of a kenpo dojo, so she is constantly practicing, and is even an instructor. She will take on anyone who threatens her friends, spirits and demons, and even teachers! But she has one weakness; pandas. Ever since she received a stuffed panda as gift from Ryuga, she has loved them, and Ryuga as well. Momoka knows how she feels about Ryuga, but doesn’t want to tell him, thinking he’ll tease her and not return her feelings.

Ryuga, the male lead, comes from a family of Chinese magic masters, and is gifted in the arts as well. He is often being asked to tell fortunes, perform prayers or make charms. Where Momoka is more gung-ho and charging into a situation without thinking, Ryuga is the calm, thoughtful one. He is always having to protect his cousin Shuran, a gifted psychic that demons are always coming after. He comes to Momoka’s rescue as well, usually when her thoughtless gets her in over her head. He is constantly teasing Momoka, which can get him a fist or kick to the face, but he can sometimes counter with his spell Paper Army Formation made up of pandas. Ryuga can be serious at times, letting slip little comments that can be interpreted as his having feelings for Momoka too, but he usually denies them, or changes their meaning by the end of the chapter, to keep her from learning the truth; that he really does love her too.

And since they continue to deny their feelings, this leaves rooms for rivals for their affections to step in. Momoka get the most, starting with Ryuga’s cousin Kouryu, who tries to kidnap Momoka and take her back to China. He’s arrogant and egotistical, and I still didn’t like him ever after the explanation of his back story. Touya is another boy who has a crush on Momoka, but turns out to have a deeper secret. He ends up hanging around though, as thorn in Ryuga side. Even Saint Dragon, the dragon possessing Momoka has him moment of infatuation, but it doesn’t last. It doesn’t stop Ryuga from still feeling jealous.

Ryuga has his suitors as well. Raika is a distant relative of Ryuga’s who wants to be his fiance. She ends up being friends with Momoka after she realizes the truth of Ryuga’s feelings for her. Akira is another new member of the Kendo club. She is a Onmyouji, as well as a competitor for Ryuga’s affections, though he doesn’t really acknowledge her beyond being a friend. She likes to use her magic to take over Momoka’s body and make it move to her will.

While I really like the ensemble of characters that have gathered through these five volumes, it’s the mythical creatures that keep appearing that really won me over. I love the dragons, and they are drawn so gorgeously and with such care! There’s also a phoenix that appears that is cute in human form, and beautiful in bird form, and a mermaid and cat demons. The variety of beasts is great and just as entertaining as the characters!

The stories are mostly stand alone at the beginning, and are fairly light. They mostly involve demons coming after Shuran, or school activities such as Kendo club or the school festival. As the series goes on though, it does start to get more serious and move into longer stories lasting more than one chapter, but Ryuga and Momoka’s relationship remains on the teeter-totter of admitting/denying their feelings.

St. Dragon Girl is a fairly light and fun romance. Matsumoto’s artwork is beautiful to look at (especially the dragons), and she uses a lot of great Chinese costuming, making the series another plus in my book. There is next to no drama, and the comedy is well-timed with the more serious moments. I can’t think of a single complaint I have about this series. Even the constant denial of the leads doesn’t bother me, but they have great chemistry, it wouldn’t matter to me if they ever got together or not. While the series is rated for teens, tweens will enjoy this series as well. Definitely read this series if you get the chance.

Young Miss Holmes Volume 1

Christie Holmes is a prodigy. At ten-years-old, she’s as familiar with the sciences and classics as any older student at Cambridge or Oxford. And her facility with logic is reminiscent of her uncle, the eminent Sherlock Holmes himself. So, what’s a brilliant young girl to do when her parents are away in India, leaving her behind in the care of maids and servants? Why, solve mysteries, of course. Along with her giant hound Nelson, Christie’s implacable curiosity leads her from one dangerous adventure to another, often joining forces with Uncle Sherlock and Doctor Watson on their famed investigations. Christie may look pint-sized, but her clever mind is never to be underestimated!

By Kaoru Shintani
Publisher: Seven Seas Entertainment
Age Rating: All Ages
Genre: Mystery
Price: $16.99
Rating: ★★★★★

I was really excited when I heard about Seven Seas’ acquisition of Young Miss Holmes. I love mysteries and Sherlock Holmes, but have also lately acquired a taste for stories about female relatives of Holmes also solving mysteries. First, his sister Enola Holmes in novel form, and now his niece Christie.

Young Miss Holmes takes classic Sherlock Holmes stories and makes changes to them, mostly to add Christie to the story, but also to make other changes as well. The way Christie becomes part of the story varies. Either she is visiting her Uncle Sherlock and deduces what is going on such as in the “Mazarin Stone”, or she stumbles onto a case the Sherlock is brought in on, such as “The Problem at Thor Bridge”. Christie can find cases on her own as well, as in the “Red-Headed League”, or takes on the whole case herself as she does in “The Adventure of the Dancing Men”. Her inclusion is done very naturally, sometimes needing only minor changes. In “Mazarin Stone”, instead of there being a dummy of Sherlock that he switches places with, Christie plays the part of a life-like doll and gets Sylvius’ confession.

Some of the changes to the story itself include adding characters such as Arthur, the adopted son in “The Problem at Thor Bridge”, and a slightly happier ending to “The Adventure of the Sussex Vampire”, with the inclusion of real vampires in the guise of characters from the series Dance in the Vampire Bund by another creator, Nozomu Tamaki. This story is book-ended nicely with a short story by Tamaki herself.

Christie is just what you would expect from a relative of Sherlock Holmes. She is hyper observant and very knowledgeable in the sciences and classics. She has a strong will and stomach to go with it, and is willful to the point of being reckless. At times she wishes she was born a man and has little patience for other girls her age. She may be just as sharp as Sherlock, but she doesn’t have the experience to put it all to use. Fortunately for her, she has Grace Dunbar as her governess. While there isn’t much Miss Dunbar can do to further Christie’s education, she still assists Christie by helping her look at things in a different way, such as there can be value found in girl’s gossip, and her quiet demeanor calms Christie so she can think more clearly. She is like Christie’s Watson.

There are two maids who often accompany Christie, Ann Marie and Nora. Ann Marie is the head maid and is Christie’s Handmaid. She is the one most often put out when Christie goes on one of her adventures, but she also seems to have a temper and carries two revolvers, which she brandishes whenever Christie is threatened, leaving Christie to sometimes beg Ann Marie not to harm the perpetrator. Nora is another maid, and comes from the lower class. She can’t read or write, and speaks with a lower class accent. She always carries a whip called the Snake Tongue, which she will whip out for any reason necessary. These traits are made all the more fun by the maids’ appearances. Ann Maria appears very proper, but when she pulls her guns, she is far from reserved. Nora has an innocent look with freckles and curly hair, that turns done right demonic when she has her whip in her hands.

I really enjoyed this first volume of Young Miss Holmes. The characters are great, and the stories retain their Holmesian feel while adding a feminine touch. I also liked that Shintani kept the Victorian mores that restricted women so much at the time. Not only does Christie have the mysteries to solve, but she must also do it within the confines of Victorian society. I really enjoy watch females break through that barrier. The art is beautiful, and the dresses Shintani comes up for Christie are just as elegant as they are varied. The art is geared more toward a younger female audience, but that doesn’t make it any less attractive. I had a lot of fun reading Young Miss Holmes, and anyone who loves mysteries and/or Sherlock Holmes will love it too.

Ace Attorney Phoenix Wright Volume 1

Mystery and intrigue, crime and punishment, uncovering the truth–all in a day’s work for the ace defense attorney Phoenix Wright and his beautiful assistant Maya Fey. Based on the hit game series, Ace Attorney brings new adventures to the games’ colorful cast. Can Nick successfully swing the gavel of justice or will he be crushed by the weight of incriminating evidence?

Story by Kenji Kuroda; Art by Kazuo Maekawa
Publisher: Kodansha Comics
Age Rating: Teen
Genre: Mystery
Price: $10.99
Rating: ★★★½☆

There’s not a lot of mystery manga available in English (unfortunately), so when a new series does come out, I like to check it out. Ace Attorney Phoenix Wright is based on a video game of the same name, and features many of the characters from it. It’s a decent police procedural, but the goofy characters, both in design and personality throws it off-kilter for me.

This first volume of Ace Attorney Phoenix Wright features one-and-two-thirds cases, which serve to introduce most of the characters. The first case has Nick defending his old friend from elementary school who doesn’t have the best luck with the ladies, as he is accused of murdering his new girlfriend’s old boyfriend. The second is much longer, and has Nick meeting a potential client, only to have the client killed in a locked room scenario.

Both stories are well written. The first takes place mostly in the court room, and uses several elements from the video game, including Nick’s “Objection!” pose. The comedy is played up more, particularly between Winston Payne, the prosecutor and Larry Butz, the defendant. In between there is murder and a woman scorned, but the impact of the case is lessened with the more comedic acts in the courtroom. The full impact doesn’t hit until the last page of the story. The second mystery takes itself much more seriously, possibly since it doesn’t take place in the courtroom, and Nick can be more of the detective than attorney. A lot of time is spent setting up the scene and the suspects, with the actual crime not happening until the end of the volume. It’s a good cliffhanger to get the reader back to find out more.

The art is on the cartoonish side, but most of this is because of the source material. The characters all look like their video game counterparts, which does sometimes swing on the silly side. Nick’s hair looks like it was blown back by a hurricane and stuck like that permanently. Larry always looks good with big red cheeks and a lot of cartoonish expressions. I know this can’t be helped as it is the way they characters were designed for the video game, but the whole look didn’t work as well as a manga for me.

I did enjoy the mysteries presented in this first volume of Ace Attorney Phoenix Wright, but I’m still on the fence about getting more. If it were available digitally, I wouldn’t be so hesitant since it wouldn’t take up precious shelf space. For now, Ace Attorney Phoenix Wright will have to sit on the back burner unless I get a craving for some more mysteries.


From on high, the gods make sport of the mortals who toil below them. None knows the cruelty of these beings better than Ganymede, a beautiful prince who was torn away from his family by the gods’ divine hands. Granted immortality, Ganymede now whiles away his days in an inescapable miniature garden for the amusement of the gods, particularly Apollo. But the gods themselves are no stranger to the boredom of eternal life, and as Ganymede quickly discovers, they will do anything to keep themselves entertained, both at his expense and at one another’s…

By Aki
Publisher: Yen Press
Age Rating: Older Teen
Genre: Fantasy
Price: $18.99
Rating: ★★★★½

I love mythology, so anytime there’s a series that comes out that has to do with some myth or legend, I want to check it out. This made Olympos a must for me to read. While I wasn’t too sure about the title at first, it had completely won me over by the end. Olympos brings up some interesting ideas about gods and immortality.

Olympos starts by introducing the reader to Ganymede, a beautiful prince who it trapped in a miniature garden. His current plight is shown, and then it flashes back to the past to show how he came to be there, and became immortal. But he isn’t really the protagonist of the book. It’s really about Apollo, the sun-god who kidnaps Ganymede and becomes his captor and tormentor. Apollo is bored, and Ganymede is just one of his diversions. After learning about Ganymede, the story focuses on Apollo and the other gods who he interacts with; Poseidon, Hades, Artemis and even Zeus.

At first, Apollo appears to be a complete jerk. He torments Ganymede mercilessly with escaping from the garden, forces him to watch his brother die, calls all humans insects, and tips a stone onto some humans building a temple to him. He also mocks Posiden, the middle brother and god of the oceans, calling him an idiot. But as I read more of his story, he became more sympathetic. The more he interacts with humans, including Ganymede, the more we see how hollow his life, and really the lives of the gods are. Even though Apollo looks down on humans as inferior, he is fascinated by the things they can do that gods can’t, such as lying, or saying things they can’t do. While he never stops looking down on Ganymede, the pair do grow some, and come to understand where each other is coming from, and it’s that understanding that made me more forgiving of Apollo’s cruel behavior.

I really enjoyed how well each character fits his description from the myths. Apollo is very capricious in his behavior toward humans, though we don’t see his amorous side. The portrayal of his relationship with his sister was intriguing as well. Poseidon is show to be very argumentative with his fellow gods and trying to get Apollo and Hades to join him in overthrowing Zeus. Hades is pragmatic and cryptic, as you would expect the god of the underworld to be, while Zeus is kept a complete mystery. As god of the sky, he is portrayed as not really seeing those around him, especially humans, though he did grow curious about Ganymede. I also really liked the idea of “the gods can not speak false”, and how that affects Apollo.

The art is just stunning. All the gods are drawn as bishonen, as is Ganymede. There is a lot of beautiful, flowing hair for everyone. Zeus is shown to be all feathers and wings, and Hades is all in black with horns, though he can appear differently depending on who is looking at him. Another touch I really enjoyed was Apollo having eyes the color of sunrise/sunset. Aki put a lot of thought into the look of the characters to match their personalities and it shows in the beautiful artwork.

Olympos is a fantastic read. The almost tragic circumstances of everyone makes it very different from most other manga out there, since it isn’t because of fate or the gods, or any of the other reasons usually given. It’s just the way their life is, and that is infinitely more interesting than having some higher thing to blame. Immortality might not be as great as we think it might be, and boredom a fate worse than death.

Bakuman Volume 12-13

Moritaka and Akito’s newest series Perfect Crime Party does well enough that they can start working on other things, such as beating their rivals. But some unexpected news sends them back to try to come up with a second series. But as each of them works on their specific talents individually, will it break up the team of Muto Ashirogi?

Story by Tsugumi Ohba; Art by Takeshi Obata
Publisher: Viz Media
Age Rating: Teen
Genre: Comedy/Drama
Price: $9.99
Rating: ★★★★½

Now that Moritaka and Akito have a series running in Jump again, the story can go back to their personal lives, as well as those of their rivals and assistants. While I do enjoy seeing process of making a successful manga through Moritaka and Akito, I’ve really come to like the other manga artists and assistants, and I do enjoy seeing what’s going on with their lives and titles.

The artist we see the life most of in these two volumes is Shun Shiratori. He is an assistant to Moritaka and Akito. His mother, who wears the pants in the family, doesn’t approve of Shun working on manga, so he runs away so he can work on creating his own title. Moritaka and Akito get involved to the point that Akito ends as the writer for Shun’s manga. There is a lot of drama created from this, not just from Shun’s family life, but also between Akito, and Moritaka and Kaya. It all comes down to a simple lack of communication, and Akito is so clueless that he doesn’t see what he’s doing to Moritaka and Kaya. A few words could have avoided the whole situation, but would have made the volumes just a little less dramatic and a lot shorter. Though I think it was Akito who deserved the punch more than Moritaka.

Hiramaru has always been fun to follow. Like, Eiji, he is a “genius” creator, but hates the work, so he is always trying to get out of it. His editor is constantly having to trick or bribe him into getting his chapters done. It’s a lot of fun to see how his editor is going to manipulate him. One way he does this is by using Hiramaru’s feelings for Miss Aoki. Promises of helping him get through afternoon tea with her gets Hiramaru to write a romantic one shot that becomes popular enough to submit for serialization, but when the day finally comes Hiramaru turns the tables on his editor and meets Miss Aoki alone. The ensuing chase is really funny, and when he finally decides to confess his feelings to Aoki, it’s great to see Fukuda, Moritaka, Akito and Kaya show up to cheer him on.

I also enjoyed seeing Eiji finally create a manga that isn’t a hit. His attempt at a romance doesn’t break the top 5. It was good to see him finally feel what it’s like, even if it was only for a one shot. Another thing I like about Bakuman, is the teasers for titles we get to see. Moritaka’s romantic one-shot looked cute, and Hiramaru’s romantic one-shot looked very funny. An entry for a contest that Akito and Moritaka are judging is shown at some length, Classroom of Truth, and is a title I would really like to read! It’s really too bad so many of these will never really be serialized.

I haven’t gotten tired of Bakuman yet. Ohba does a great job of keeping the story fresh, and balancing between the manga creation process and the lives of the artists. Just concentrating on one or the other too much would ruin the charm.

Review copies provided by publisher.

RG Veda Volume 1-10

At the dawn of creation, gods and men walked together in Tenkai, the place between heaven and earth. The former God-King Tentei was betrayed by his general Taishakuten and killed along with the most powerful Guardian Warrior, Ashura. Now, Taishakuten rules Tenkai with an iron hand, killing the entire clan for one person’s opposition to him. A prophesy foretells the end of Taishakuten’s rule, and it starts with the awakening of the last of the Ashura tribe by Lord Yasha, king of the Yasha tribe. These two being a journey filled with blood and tragedy, as they try to end Taishakuten’s rule while defying prophesy.

Publisher: Tokyopop
Age Rating: Teen
Genre: Fantasy
Price: $9.99
Rating: ★★★★½

And the quest continues to find a CLAMP series I like. Right now it’s one yay, one nay, and one abstention. This series will be the tie-breaker, and is the last CLAMP series I own. It’s also the first CLAMP series I ever bought, and completing it took a while, so it was easy to put off. This Manga Movable Feast motivated me to finally read it. RG Veda is CLAMP’s debut series as professional manga artists, and tells the story of ancient gods and humans and the struggle against destiny, in the vein of the Hindu Veda text. And while I was warned off this series on Twitter, I found I really enjoyed it.

RG Veda follows Lord Yasha, the Guardian Warrior of the North, as he goes on a journey with Ashura, the last of the Ashura clan, in defiance of the God King Taishakuten. They follow a prophesy that is believed to foretell the end of Taishakuten’s reign, gathering “the Six Stars”, others who hold a grudge against Taishakuten. Meanwhile, Taishakuten is trying to stop them, as he send his “Four Gods”, powerful warriors and their armies after them, killing anyone who gets in his way. But stopping Taishakuten isn’t really the point of the journey. There is another purpose that isn’t revealed until the end, but like life, the story isn’t really about the destination, but the journey.

What really makes the story fun to read is the characters, and there is quite a cast of them. Lord Yasha is the strong, stoic hero, who can be dense sometimes, but is deeply loyal to his friends and family and keeps his promises. He is also a bit of a softy when it comes to Ashura, who he develops and father-son relationship with. Ashura as he is seen through most of the series, is a sensitive boy. He cares greatly for his friends, and feels it personally when someone dies because of him or for him. There is another personality within Ashura we’ll call Dark Ashura, that doesn’t care about anyone, or anything other than causing destruction. Ashura doesn’t know about this side of him, and Dark Ashura only pops up occasionally until the end. The relationship between these two is really the focus of the series. Yasha sacrifices everything for Ashura, who he is told is destined to kill him. At first Yasha does this for a promise he made, but soon really does care for the boy. Ashura is able to grow and become stronger thanks to Yasha’s faith and love for him, which all leads to the climatic ending.

Joining Yasha and Ashura are the prophesied “Six Stars.” Souma is the last of her tribe which was killed by Taishakuten because of the ability to give immortality to one person, and was saved by Lady Kendappa, the Royal Musician. Souma acts as scout and spy, gathering information for the group. Lord Ryuu of the Dragon Tribe, is there for the comedy relief mostly, joining so he can become and better fighter and take on Yasha in a duel. He and Ashura become friends, as Ryuu is the closest in age to him. Jukaju adds a lot of comedy relief as well. He isn’t one of the stars, but is more of an observer, giving out clues to Yasha about the prophesy they seek to fulfill. Lady Karura of the Karura tribe has deep grudge against Taishakuten, and who can blame her. He kidnapped her weak sister, forced her to sing with her last breath before Karura and then fed her body to his pets.

Speaking of Taishakuten, there is no other way to describe him than to say he’s a total bastard. What he did to Karura sister is a prime example. All the way through to volume 5, that is exactly how he acts. I thought he was going to be one of those rare pure evil villains in manga. But starting in volume 6, there are hints that he might not be as bad as he seems. Even after his past is explained, I don’t buy it. He’s still a bastard. He ruthlessly kills Karura and Kisshouten, saying he was doing them a favor. He claims that he’s doing what he’s doing to keep the Six Stars from gathering, but if anything, he’s just encouraging them! I think he just wants to fight Ashura, and isn’t really serious about stopping them. The general he sends after them, Koumokuten, is closer to comedy relief, and his minions, the elemental gods, ARE comedy relief. He doesn’t want anyone to kill Ashura but himself.

I really enjoyed RG Veda. I love myths and legends, and this story is very much in that vein. It feels like a myth you would here Joseph Campbell talking about. The story’s theme, that love can overcome all, even destiny, is very much in the tradition of the Arthurian legends and courtly love. The fact that the lovers are two men, well that is definitely more of CLAMP touch. While it’s mostly action and drama, there a good moments of humor to break the tension and keep the story from being a complete downer. A lot of people die that you want to see live. There are also a lot of twists! The last two volumes are one twist after another, nearly giving me whiplash, but they were well planned and executed. I totally did not expect the reveal of the God of the East, even though the signs were there. What made these twists work is the way CLAMP played with the reader’s expectations and kept the changes in character. So while the twists were a surprise, they weren’t a shock.

One of the things I use as a meter for how much I like a title is how involved I get in the story and characters, and I got really involved with RG Veda. Every person who died for Ashura and Yasha only made me want to see them succeed more. When Karyoubinga was killed, I felt Karura’s grief and anger. That moment moved Taishakuten from jerk to bastard, and he became unforgivable. The stronger I feel about a story and or characters, the more likely I’m to enjoy the story. And I felt very strongly about these characters and their journey. The art is filled with lots of beautiful men and women with long flowing hair and ornamental jewelry. Everything I love in a fantasy manga.

I had my doubts at first, but RG Veda has won me over, and my count goes to 2 yays, one nay, and one abstention. So I can now say I have read and do like some CLAMP titles. But I can now also see the polarizing effect it can have on people. The two titles I’ve liked the most, are also the two I’ve heard the least good about from other reviewers. But that’s okay, I’m not one to jump on a bandwagon. I do tend to want to check things out that people are talking about, but I’ll still make my own decision about how I feel. And that’ what I love about these Manga Moveable Feasts. I’ve read more titles that I probably wouldn’t have without them. I am more likely now to try out other CLAMP titles as well, with Card Captor Sakura being at the top of my list. If only Dark Horse had their omnibuses available in digital format.